How to Pimp Out Your Children…Separatist Style

Hey gang, I’ve been very busy the past couple of weeks, but I’m still committed to keeping the blog chugging along as much as possible with little in the way of activity gaps.

While I don’t really have time to write up a piece today, there is nonetheless an extremely alarming situation that was brought up by CJAD radio journalist, Dan Delmar.

While the separatists have never shied away from using early education as a vehicle for brainwashing children early on in their lives, this will no doubt leave you gritting your teeth with rage.

Just wait until you read the rebuttal from the school, too.

Click here to read the full story

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8 thoughts on “How to Pimp Out Your Children…Separatist Style

  1. J’ai moi aussi trouvé très intéressant cet article de CJAD.

    Une des question du manuel : “Si une jeune ingénieure d’origine mexicaine immigrait au Québec, dans quelle région lui suggérais-tu de s’installer?”

    Cette question semble avoir choqué plusieurs commentateurs, elle inciterait à la discrimination.

    Cette question me semble, à moi aussi, un peu étrange. Devrait-on suggérer à cette mexicaine de s’installer à Montréal parce qu’elle pourrait trouver à Montréal une communauté de mexicains? Logiquement, je suggérais à cette immigrante de s’installer à Québec plutôt qu’à Montréal car le chômage y est plus bas et les maisons moins chères. Qu’est-ce que le fait qu’elle soit mexicaine a à faire là-dedans?

    Recommander à cette jeune femme de s’installer à Montréal car elle y trouverait une communauté mexicaine dénote une magnifique intégration de la pensée multiculturaliste canadienne. Et dans un étrange paradoxe, cette intégration de la pensée multiculturaliste canadienne vaut aux québécois des accusations de xénophobie et de discrimination.

    • “Logiquement, je suggérais à cette immigrante de s’installer à Québec plutôt qu’à Montréal car le chômage y est plus bas et les maisons moins chères. Qu’est-ce que le fait qu’elle soit mexicaine a à faire là-dedans?”

      What Michel wrote: “Logically, I would recommend to an immigrant to set roots in Quebec City rather than Montreal. There’s a lower unemployment rate and the cost of housing is lower. What difference does it make if she’s Mexican?”

      Michel, in some ways I do agree with you that governments should try and promote regions other than popular urban centers to immigrants (there would be many benefits for both the newcomers and immigrants alike), I believe the ire over her being Mexican is this…Latinos are extremely family oriented.

      To give you contrast, my friend from Vancouver went to Costa Rica, fell in love with a local Tica and wanted to marry her. First, he had to ask her father for his blessing. The blessing was given, but was contingent on the couple remaining in CR. He was NOT to try and take her back to Canada. Even if he tried, he would have failed. His wife doesn’t even want to live more than 15km away from her family.

      The same goes for Philippinos – they are also very family-centric and will stay closeby to their own communities wherever they immigrate together. So, family question aside, it’s basic human nature for most people to gravitate towards their own communities.

      “Recommander à cette jeune femme de s’installer à Montréal car elle y trouverait une communauté mexicaine dénote une magnifique intégration de la pensée multiculturaliste canadienne. Et dans un étrange paradoxe, cette intégration de la pensée multiculturaliste canadienne vaut aux québécois des accusations de xénophobie et de discrimination.”

      What Michel wrote: “To recommend to this Mexican immigrant that she set herself up in Montreal because she’d be able to live among the city’s Mexican community, is a typical trait of the Canadian model of “integration” that is multiculturalism. Strangely enough, this very spirit of integration that comes from Canadian multiculturalism sees the people of Quebec often being accused of xenophobia and discrimination.”

      Michel, we’ve gone through this before.

      You’ve clearly never lived extensively outside of your own society and “integrated” yourself among a foreign people on an extensive level.

      I’ve travelled extensively in my and believe me, I’ve taken notice of the behavioural patterns of the Quebecois out and abroad and yes, they stick largely to their own whenever feasible. I hereby challenge you to go to Toronto and stay there for two entire months. Go to Kensington Market. Immerse yourself. It won’t take long for you to see why the multicultural model does work.

      And if it doesn’t work for you? Perhaps that’s because you were in too much of a hurry to return amongst “your people” where you can speak the language and cultural practices you’re most familiar and at ease with.

      • ” it’s basic human nature for most people to gravitate towards their own communities. ”

        Je comprends de ton sermon que tu comprends que de suggérer, comme dans le manuel, que l’immigrante mexicaine s’installe à Montréal car elle y trouverait d’autres mexicains montre une certaine sensibilité à la réalité des immigrants, un certain respect du désir légitime de se retrouver entre gens partageant une même culture, etc. Et c’est bien, je crois, dans l’esprit du multiculturalisme canadien.

        Or, la question du manuel et sa réponse vont justement dans ce sens et sont bien dans l’esprit du multiculturalisme canadien. Mais, je le répète, ce qui est justement dans l’esprit du multicuturalisme canadien (le respect du fait qu’une immigrante mexicaine souhaite côtoyer d’autres mexicains) vaut aux québécois des accusations de xénophobie et de discrimination.

        Les canadiens voient le Canada comme une communauté de communautés, c’est le sacro-saint multiculturalisme. Les québécois écrivent dans un manuel qu’on pourrait suggérer à une immigrante mexicaine de s’installer à Montréal où elle trouverait une communauté mexicaine, et on les accuse de discrimination et de xénophobie. C’est paradoxal.

      • Let me give you my two cents based on my life experience.

        I, along with my wife and son, do not care if the place we live in does not have people from the our home country’s community. That was why we were comfortable with Montreal. Otherwise, we would have no other choice in the first place than Toronto or Vancouver.

        With my preference like that, I can say categorically that Quebec City region is not a good place for me to find a job. Even if I mastered French 100%. The jobs are simply not there. If one is looking for a white-collar, knowledge-based, good-pay, private-sector jobs, in Quebec those jobs are concentrated in Montreal and nowhere else.

  2. Pingback: The Separatist Spin on Where Immigrants Should Go | Separatist Lies Exposed

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